10.0.0.1

Your broadband router or your wireless access point comes from the factory with default settings, such as the router’s internal IP address (for which the most common options are 192.168.0.1, 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.1.254), administrative username and password combination (for most common router password and login combinations see our list). For your first login to the administrative console you need to know the default router IP address, which you may find on a sticker in the bottom of the device, look up in the router’s manual, or simply google. However, we strongly recommend that you modify the default settings of your router after the first login.

Why change the IP address of a wireless router?

As far as Wi-Fi networks are concerned, for user convenience router manufacturers often use their brand names as default Wi-Fi network names. At the same time, the default router IP address for every brand and model is public knowledge and can be easily looked up on the web. An advanced computer user may succeed in logging into the wireless network at your home or office and proceed to your router’s administrative console, knowing your router’s brand and trying default IP address options one by one. By changing the factory settings of your router to custom parameters you add a layer to your Wi-Fi network security and protect your personal data.

10.0.0.1 — a simple, easy to memorize custom IP address for a router

Almost any combination matching the IPv4 criteria (4 groups of numbers separated by dots, 1 to 3 digits in every block) is good for a custom router IP address, but when we speak of something easy to memorize and easy to type, 10.0.0.1 is our first choice. It is a class A IP address reserved for private networks, and it is used as a default gateway address by very few router manufacturers in the world. After you make the necessary changes in the ‘Network Configuration’ or ‘Local Network’ tab of your router’s administrative console, you’ll need to type 10.0.0.1 instead of the default IP address every time you want to configure or troubleshoot your router.